5 self-publishing truths few authors talk about

Here’s an excellent post for folks thinking about self-publishing (and a good read for those of us who have done so, but haven’t yet achieved fame and fortune🙂 )

5 self-publishing truths few authors talk about.

About dvberkom

Bestselling author of the Kate Jones and Leine Basso thrillers. View all posts by dvberkom

13 responses to “5 self-publishing truths few authors talk about

    • dvberkom

      It’s kind of comforting to know that we’re not alone in experiencing many of the trials and tribulations having to do with this writing gig. Yes, the “early days” of eBooks were awesome, and if you got in around that time it was a pretty heady experience. But I still find so much satisfaction in being able to publish my stuff and actually have people read it that even during the inevitable roller coaster periods it’s still 100 times better than what I used to do for a living.

      Thanks for dropping by, Yvonne!

      Liked by 1 person

  • maddidavidson

    Number 6?: Many will still not consider that you are a “real” author unless someone else publishes your work.

    Liked by 1 person

    • dvberkom

      True, but these days I seem to run into far fewer people who think that way, maddidavidson. I’ll admit, I may have gotten around that a bit by creating my own publishing company (Duct Tape Press) and having several books out with good reviews, but that kind of thinking looks like it’s going the way of the dodo. If anyone did say anything like that to me, however, I’d just shrug it off as someone who has no idea of the work involved in self-publishing, not to mention writing a novel. Ignorance will always exist, unfortunately.

      Like

  • Trudy Brandenburg

    Thanks, Dv for posting. I just worked on my taxes this afternoon and I laughed when I saw how few books I sold. I have the best luck at local events like craft fairs and book clubs. I’m not writing my books for the money – at all. I simply published my first book just to see if I could do it and I love writing about Emma and her crew. She has a small fan club. It’s just fun and I’ve met the greatest people through my writing (you via email) and I discovered one of my favorite places – the Lake Erie region – attending the bi-annual Word Lovers retreats. I just had this discussion with a friend of mine who just self-pubbed her first book and is terribly disappointed in the sales. Your post was spot-on as to our discussion. Keep writing! It’s fun to do something that I enjoy instead of something I have to just for money. Doing what I love and hoping the $$ will follow. Toodles, Trudy

    Liked by 1 person

    • dvberkom

      Yes! That’s why we write–because we enjoy spending time with our characters, and sharing them with whoever wants to read our stuff. So much less pressure that way!

      Thanks for stopping by, Trudy🙂

      Like

  • Polly Iyer

    Publishing right now is definitely a crapshoot. Timing has a lot to do with everything. How early you got in. Whether what you write is trending. Whether you can keep producing solid work. When and how you market. And more. It’s a delicate balance. Take the time to do it right, because the minute you turn out a piece of crap with a lousy cover, you lose everything you’ve built.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Dylan Hearn

    Thank you for reflagging my post. I’m glad you found it informative. The reason I wrote it was that I’d seen a number of authors feel frustrated when their book didn’t sell as well as they thought it should. There could be a huge number of reasons for this but many times the book was doing OK, it was the author’s expectations that were unrealistic, especially for debut novels. Hopefully, my post will provide encouragement to these people that they aren’t failing, it is normal, and to view self-publishing as a long game rather than an easy route to success.

    Like

    • Dylan Hearn

      That should have been reblogging. I hate autocorrect🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • dvberkom

        Thank you for posting it, Dylan. It’s one of the most realistic posts about self-pubbing I’ve seen. And I agree–it’s generally author expectations that get in the way of feeling good about writing progress/success. I think you’ve done a service to debut authors out there–there’s nothing more crushing to an artist than feeling like a failure.

        Thanks for commenting!

        Like

  • augustmacgregor

    Thanks for the link — this is a great article!

    Liked by 1 person

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